Washington State Climate Change Impacts Assessment Conference

Announcements:

2.18.09 - Conference presentations are now posted on the "Agenda" page. Other conference materials are posted on the "Materials" page.

3.27.09 - Final version of the WACCIA Executive Summary (pdf) and individual report chapters (in Word format) now available.

In July 2007, the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group (CIG) launched an unprecedented assessment of climate change impacts on Washington State. Funded by the Washington State legislature, the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment (WACCIA) evaluated the impacts of climate change on eight sectors:

Options for adapting to climate change within each of these sectors were also considered. Research for the WACCIA was conducted by the CIG in partnership with Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

A one-day conference on the results of the Washington assessment will be held on February 12, 2009 at the Washington State Convention Center. The conference will provide an opportunity to learn more about the results of the assessment and to discuss implications for Washington's communities and ecosystems. Updates on global climate change science, resources for building adaptive capacity for climate change, and state-level actions to address climate change will also be discussed. For more details on the day's events, see the conference agenda.

Who Should Attend

The WACCIA Conference is open to the public. The following individuals are particularly encouraged to attend:

Registration

Registration is now closed. The registration fee for the conference is $100 until January 30, 2009. Late registration ($135) is January 31-February 6, 2009. Those eligible for registrationtravel reimbursement can continue to registerat the $100 through February 6 (see details on the registration page). No registrations will be accepted after February 6, 2009. A limited number of reduced registrations ($75) are also available for eligible participants.

Conference Goals

Goals for the WACCIA conference include:

Conference Support

The Climate Impacts Group would like to thank the following organizations for their support of the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment conference:

Climate Imapcts Group

Agenda

Streaming audio files (streaming with the presentation files) are provided for each presentation from the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment conference, including breakout sessions (see end of agenda page; click on breakout session title to open the breakout session agenda). Power Point or PDF copies of the presentations without the audio are also provided.

For Windows users, the paired audio/presentation files are best viewed using Windows Media Player version 10 or higher (available as a free download).

Registration

7:30-9:00

 

Welcome/Opening Remarks - Edward Miles, UW Climate Impacts Group and Jay Manning, Director, Washington Department of Ecology

9:00

 

 

Introduction to the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment (WACCIA) - Edward Miles, UW Climate Impacts Group

9:15

 

 

Update on Global Climate Change Science Since the 2007 IPCC Assessment - Philip Mote, UW Climate Impacts Group and Washington State Climatologist

9:30

 

 

Q&A #1 on Morning Presentations

10:00

 

Break

10:15

 

Key Findings from the WACCIA - Marketa McGuire Elsner, UW Climate Impacts Group

10:45

 

 

The Whys and Hows of Adapting to Climate Change - Lara Whitely Binder, UW Climate Impacts Group

11:15

 

 

Q&A #2 on Morning Presentations

11:45

 

Lunch (provided)

12:00

 

Sector Breakouts - Agriculture, coasts, energy, forests, human health, hydrology/water resources, salmon, and urban stormwater infrastructure (see individual session agendas and Power Point presentations below)

1:00

 

Break / Reconvene in plenary

3:30

 

Tools and Resources for Building Adaptive Capacity - Lara Whitely Binder, UW Climate Impacts Group

3:45

 

 

State-level Actions to Address Climate Change Preparation and Adaptation - Spencer Reeder, Washington Department of Ecology

4:15

 

 

Closing Remarks - Edward Miles, UW Climate Impacts Group

4:45

 

 

Conference Adjourns

5:00

 

 

Breakout Session Agendas (click on headings for schedules)

All breakout sessions are 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Agriculture (Room 604)

Introduction/Overview - Ralph Cavalieri, Director, WSU Agricultural Research Center

1:00

 

Presentation

1:15

 

Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Eastern Washington Agriculture - Claudio Stöckle, Professor and Dept. Chair, Washington State University

 

 

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Chad Kruger, Washington State University
Panelists:

2:15

 

  • Ralph Cavalieri, Director, WSU Agricultural Research Center
  • Kirk Cook, Natural Resources Assessment Section Manager, Washington Dept. of Agriculture
  • Andy Jenson, Director of Research Washington, State Potato Commission
  • Craig Smith, Resource Adviser, Northwest Food Processors Association

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Claudio Stöckle, Professor and Dept. Chair, Washington State University

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Coasts (Room 613/614)

Introduction/Overview - Dan Huppert, UW School of Marine Affairs

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

 

Coastal Impacts: Overview, Shellfish Aquaculture, Aquifers, and Ports - Dan Huppert, UW School of Marine Affairs

 

 

Coastal Impacts: Beaches, Spits, Bluffs, and Future Research Needs - Amber Moore, UW School of Marine Affairs

 

 

Legal Implications of Sea Level Rise - Jessica Levin, Attorney at Law

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dan Huppert, UW School of Marine Affairs
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Hugh Shipman, Coastal Geologist, Washington Dept. of Ecology
  • Robin Downey, Executive Director, Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Assoc.
  • Andy Haub, Planning and Engineering Mngr., City of Olympia Dept. of Public Works
  • Greg Hood, Research Scientist, Skagit River System Cooperative
  • Sue Mauermann, Director of Environmental Programs, Port of Tacoma

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Dan Huppert, UW School of Marine Affairs

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Energy (Room 609)

Introduction/Overview - Alan Hamlet, UW Climate Impacts Group

1:00

 

Presentation

1:05

 

Effects of Projected Climate Change on Energy Supply and Demand in the Pacific Northwest and Washington State - Alan Hamlet, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Alan Hamlet, UW Climate Impacts Group
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Dick Adams, Executive Director, Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Comm.
  • Lynn Best, Environmental Affairs Director, Seattle City Light
  • Adam Bless, Facility Analyst, Oregon Dept. of Energy
  • Scott Eichelberger, Managing Director, 3 Tier North America
  • Jason Eisdorfer, Bonneville Power Administration
  • Stan Price, Executive Director, Northwest Energy Efficiency Council
  • David Sjoding, Renewables and Engineering Div. Mngr., WSU Energy Program

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Alan Hamlet, UW Climate Impacts Group

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Forests (Room 612)

Introduction/Overview - Don McKenzie, U.S. Forest Service

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

Washington's Forests in a Changing Climate - Don McKenzie, U.S. Forest Service

 

 

The Role of Climate Change in Tree Species Distribution and Productivity - Jeremy Littell, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

Climate Change as a Driver in Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks in Eastern Washington - Elaine Oneil, UW College of Forest Resources

 

 

Fire and Climate Change in Washington - Jeremy Littell, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dave Peterson, U.S. Forest Service
Panelists:

2:20

  • Craig Partridge, Policy Director, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources
  • Kathy O'Halloran, Natural Resources Staff Officer, Olympic National Forest
  • Karen Ripley, Forest Health Program Mngr., Washington Dept. of Natural Resources
  • Steve Rigdon, Yakama Power

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Jeremy Littell, UW Climate Impacts Group

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Human Health (Room 611)

Introduction/Overview - Roger Rosenblatt, UW School of Medicine

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

 

Heat-Related Mortality in Washington State, Past and Future - J. Elizabeth Jackson, UW Dept. of Sociology

 

 

Climate Change, Air Quality, and Health - Catherine Karr, UW School of Public Health and Community Medicine

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Roger Rosenblatt, UW School of Medicine
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Gregg Grunenfelder, Assistant Secretary, Div. of Environmental Health, Washington Dept. of Health
  • Brian Lamb, Regents Professor, Washington State University
  • Richard Hoskins, Spatial Epidemiologist, Washington State Dept.of Health and UW Epidemiology, Bioinformatics
  • Ngozi Oleru, Director, Seattle-King County Public Health/ Environmental Health Division
  • Bob Saunders, Air Quality Program, Washington Dept. of Ecology

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Catherine Karr, UW School of Public Health and Community Medicine

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Hydrology and Water Resources (Room 606/607)

Introduction/Overview - Dennis Lettenmaier, UW Climate Impacts Group

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

 

Implications of 21st Century Climate Change for the Hydrology of Washington State - Marketa McGuire Elsner, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

Climate Change Impacts on Water Management in the State of Washington - Julie Vano, UW Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Dennis Lettenmaier, UW Climate Impacts Group
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Ken Brettman, Hydraulic Engineer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • Joan Kersnar, Water System Planning Supervisor, Seattle Public Utilities
  • Tom Laurie, Governmental Liaison, Washington Dept. of Ecology
  • Pat McGrane, Program Manager, River and Reservoir Operations Group, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
  • Phil Pasteris, Principal Technologist, CH2M Hill
  • Lorna Stickel, Water Resources Planning Manager, Portland Water Bureau

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Dennis Lettenmaier, UW Climate Impacts Group

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Salmon (Room 602/603)

Introduction/Overview - Nate Mantua, UW Climate Impacts Group

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

 

Projected Impacts of Climate Change on Freshwater Temperatures and Why This Is Significant for Washington's Salmon - Ingrid Tohver, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

Projected Climate Change Impacts on Aspects of Streamflow Important for Salmon - Nate Mantua, UW Climate Impacts Group

 

 

Direct and Indirect Impacts of Climate Change on WA Salmon In Freshwater; Adaptation Options and Strategies - Pete Bisson, U.S. Forest Service PNW Station

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Nate Mantua, UW Climate Impacts Group
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Michelle McClure, Research Fish Biologist, NOAA
  • Sara LaBorde, Special Assistant to the Director, Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
  • Kit Rawson, Harvest Management Biologist, Tulalip Tribes
  • Charles ("Chuck") Hudson, CRITFC

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Nate Mantua, UW Climate Impacts Group

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

Urban Stormwater Infrastructure (Room 608)

Introduction/Overview - Derek Booth, University of Washington and Stillwater Sciences, Inc.

1:00

 

Presentations

1:05

 

Historical and Future Trends in Precipitation Extremes in Washington State - Eric Rosenburg, UW Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

 

 

Predicting Future Flood Extremes in the Seattle Area - David Hartley, Northwest Hydraulics

 

 

Summary of Climate Change Impacts on Stormwater Infrastructure - Derek Booth, University of Washington and Stillwater Sciences, Inc.

 

 

Presentation Q&A - audio file only (.wmv)

 

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Derek Booth, University of Washington and Stillwater Sciences, Inc.
Panelists:

2:20

 

  • Bill Leif, Snohomish County
  • Gary Schimek, Seattle Public Utilities
  • Ed O'Brien, Washington Dept. of Ecology
  • Paula Vanhaagen, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

Research/Policy Needs (facilitated discussion)
Facilitator: Derek Booth, University of Washington and Stillwater Sciences, Inc.

3:10

 

Break/End of Breakout Session (return to plenary at 3:45)

3:30

 

On-line registration is now closed.

Washington state, county, local, and tribal government employees - please see the important announcement below about registration and travel reimbursement. Pre-approval from the Climate Impacts Group on reimbursement estimates is required.

The registration fee includes lunch, refreshment breaks, and conference materials. A limited number of reduced registrations are available for students, tribal governments, and non-profit organizations. Payment by credit card (Visa and Mastercard) is requested.

Registration Fees

$100 – Early registration (by January 30)*
$135 – Late registration (January 31-February 6)*
$ 75 – Limited reduced registration** (available until reserved spaces are taken)

* Those eligible forregistration/travel reimbursement (Washington state, county, local, and tribal government employees) can continue toregister at the $100 rate through February 6. Please select the "Government Rate - Reimbursement Approved" button when registering between January 31 and February 6.

** Eligible categories for the reduced registration include students, tribal governments, and non-profit organizations. Space is limited for reduced registration.

Cancellations / Refunds

Cancellations and refund requests received by January 30, 2009 will be subject to a $25 administrative processing fee. Cancellations received after January 30 but before February 6, 2009 will be charged $50. No refunds are available after February 6, 2009. If you are unable to attend, you may send a substitute in your place. Please submit your cancellation in writing to debryant@u.washington.edu or 206-616-1902.

NEW! Registration and Travel Reimbursement Now Available for a Limited Number of Washington State, County, Local, and Tribal Government Employees

Thanks to a reallocation of funds originally provided by the Washington State Legislature, the Climate Impacts Group is now able to offer reimbursement for expenses incurred to attend the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment conference for an estimated 300 Washington state, county, local, and tribal government employees. This benefit applies to current registrants as well as new registrants. Eligible expenses for reimbursement include:

To help ensure that as many people as possible can benefit from this reimbursement offer, we ask that you please limit your reimbursement request to $250/person if possible. We will reimburse above this threshold assuming funding is available (we currently expect no problems reimbursing above the $250 limit).

To claim reimbursement, you will need to do the following:

  1. Estimate your total expenses and email your estimate to the Climate Impacts Group. We will send you an email as soon as possible confirming that we have funds available to cover your anticipated expenses. As of 1.25.09, we anticipate having enough funds to handle requests through the end of early registration (1.30.09) and possibly through the end of registration on 2.6.09. Note: Those eligible forregistration/travel reimbursement can continue toregister at the $100 through February 6. Please select the "Government Rate - Reimbursement Approved" button when registering between January 31 and February 6.
  2. Pay for the conference and travel expenses up front. Employees must follow their respective agency travel guidelines for obtaining permission and travel reimbursement for the conference.
  3. Have your agency invoice the Climate Impacts Group (see invoicing information below). The Climate Impacts Group will reimburse the agency for the expenses based on the invoice sent by the agency.

We will keep this offer open as long as possible depending on how quickly anticipated expenses approach our budget limit. As noted above, we currently anticipate having enough funds to handle requests through the end of early registration (1.30.09) and possibly through the end of registration on 2.6.09. We will update this page when we are no longer able to accept any new reimbursable registrations. Please note that the conference cancellation policies still apply,

Invoicing the Climate Impacts Group. The following information can be used by state, county, and local government agencies to invoice the Climate Impacts Group:

Organization name: University of Washington Climate Impacts Group
Address: Box 355672
Seattle, WA 98195-5672
Attention: Adrienne Karpov
Phone: 206-616-5350
Event Name: The Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment Conference
Event Date: February 12, 2009
Event Location: Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

Invoices can be sent per individual or for groups of people within a single agency, department, or other sub-group. If an invoice is sent for multiple people, please list each individual's name, the total expenses per individual, and dates of travel.

Questions on Reimbursement?

If you have questions about the reimbursement benefit, please contact Adrienne Karpov at 206-616-5350 or Lara Whitely Binder at 206-616-5349.

Questions on Registration in General? (excluding reimbursement)

If you have questions specifically related to conference registration, please contact:

Debra Bryant
debryant@u.washington.edu
206-616-1902

The Washington State Climate Change Impacts Assessment Conference will be held at the Washington State Convention and Trade Center in downtown Seattle.

The Convention Center operates two public parking facilities. The Center's main parking garage is located within the facility and provides spaces for 1035 vehicles. The main entrance to the garage is on 8th Avenue between Seneca and Pike Streets. There is a 6'5" maximum vehicle height restriction. The garage is open seven days a week, from 5:00 a.m. until midnight.

The Freeway Park Garage is located next to the Convention Center and provides space for an additional 655 vehicles. The main entrance to the garage is at 1300 Hubbell Place (between Seneca and Pike Streets). A convenient pedestrian walkway connects the garage directly to the Convention Center. The Freeway Park Garage is normally open weekdays from 6:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. The garage is normally closed on the weekends. Parking in downtown Seattle can be expensive. Some parking lots a few blocks from the Seattle Convention Center may be less costly.

You are encouraged to use Metro. Metro's Convention Place Station is a convenient hub for many bus routes and is located just one block north of the Convention Center on 9th Avenue at Pine Street. It is one of five stops along the electric bus tunnel that serves downtown Seattle. Metro bus rides are FREE within a designated downtown area.

If you chose to take public transportation, the following site will be offering you assistance in finding the appropriate information: Metro Trip Planner

Driving Directions

Getting to the Washington State Convention and Trade Center (WSCTC)

WSCTC map

(A) From I-5 Southbound:

(B) From I-5 Northbound:

(C) From I-90 Westbound:

The following materials were given to conference participants:

Individual chapters from the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment are available here.

Related on-air news stories/features:

Related print news stories:

Climate Impacts Group

The Climate Impacts Group (CIG) is an interdisciplinary research group studying the impacts of natural climate variability and global climate change ("global warming") on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW). Through research and interaction with regional stakeholders, the CIG works to increase the resilience of the Pacific Northwest to fluctuations in climate.

CIG research focuses on four key sectors of the PNW environment: water resources, aquatic ecosystems, forests, and coasts. Recent funding from the State of Washington (the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment) also enabled the CIG to expand research into three new areas specifically for Washington State: agriculture, human health, and urban stormwater infrastructure.

The CIG is unique in its focus on the intersection of climate science and public policy. The CIG performs fundamental research on climate impacts and works with PNW planners and policy makers to apply this information to regional decision making processes. The CIG is part of the Center for Science in the Earth System at the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO).